Category Archives: reading

Focusing Class Discussion on What Students Want to Talk About #WorkshopWorksForAP

In a reading workshop, students often read their own books at their own pace, books that they choose themselves. While there is space for this kind of independent reading in AP Lit, whole class novels are also important. Discussion surrounding … Continue reading

Posted in #WorkshopWorksForAP, 21st century teaching and learning, AP Lit, blog series, cultivating real learning, engagement, literacy, reading, summer 2018 blog series, teaching literature, teaching reading, workshop teaching | Leave a comment

When building a classroom library for reading workshop is not practical

In my incremental movement toward a high school reading/writing workshop classroom, one piece I’ve struggled with is the classroom library. I see photos of Penny Kittle’s classroom library, and I get anxious to create the same for my students. I … Continue reading

Posted in 21st century teaching and learning, literacy, making change, reading, teaching reading, workshop teaching | 1 Comment

School Ruined Reading. Ellison Brought Me Back

I recently went through the books on my shelves in my office at school. There on the shelf, back behind a stack of assorted novels, was Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison. It was not just any copy of this book. … Continue reading

Posted in literacy, reading, reflections, teaching literature, teaching reading, workshop teaching | 3 Comments

Student Feedback: How my students said my class helped them as readers

I’ve been putting off this post, even at one point thought I could just not write it. But I must–this is the weak link in my classroom. I have umpteen ideas and plans about how to help my students become … Continue reading

Posted in engagement, making change, muddling through, reading, reflections, student feedback, teaching literature, teaching reading, using data, workshop teaching | 2 Comments

Science Suggests Measurable Benefits To Reading Serious Literature: From the NYT Blog

For Better Social Skills, Scientists Recommend a Little Chekhov – NYTimes.com. This article from the NYT Blog was sent to me by three different people. So I guess I had to share. It’s interesting science. But what really struck me … Continue reading

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Reading, reading, reading…

We have been reading Penny Kittle’s Book Love and talking a lot about how we might set up our classes so as to encourage more reading. I know in my honors level 11th grade class, if the students only read the … Continue reading

Posted in 21st century teaching and learning, cultivating real learning, making change, reading, teaching literature, teaching reading | 2 Comments

Beyond Dioramas: Inviting Students to Read and Read and Read

There have been some dramatic moments for my daughter in 4th grade this year. Aside from her grade-stress meltdown that I wrote about, there was also the drama of the lost reading log. My daughter’s class is nearing the end … Continue reading

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SparkNotes Nation | To Make a Prairie

SparkNotes Nation | To Make a Prairie. Not much to say about this but “yep.”

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Cultivating Book Love

I’m about two thirds through Penny Kittle’s latest, Book Love. This book helps me to identify the mismatch between what I hope for my students as readers and what is actually unfolding in my classroom. A lot that is good … Continue reading

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Huckleberry Finn’s ending? Psychology and artistic interpretation from Sci Am Blogs

This article, offering a psychological take on the problematic ending of Huck Finn, rolled up in google reader and made for an interesting distraction this afternoon. I have long agreed with the critical viewpoint that the ending of the novel … Continue reading

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